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Some Tips on Interior Trimming

by Eric MaLossi

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"While my car was off the road for painting I though I would take the time to redo some of the interior. After some trial and error, I was able to figure out a few tricks that made the process a bit easier, and I decided to write them up for posterity."

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2006-08-11 00:57:16  |  Roger writes:

Thanks to Eric for allowing us to host this article.


2007-04-16 23:16:53  |  Kurt writes:

Great to know that there are other souls out there


2008-09-02 12:14:11  |  Mark writes:

Many thanks to Eric for posting this. Having installed the interior in a Series One FHC, I can say that the A-pillar/crash rail pieces were a royal pain. One item that came in really handy was a hobbyist's heat gun, for warming vinyl while pulling it around curves. They are available at hobby shops everywhere for not much money. It will also come in handy when installing a new dash pad.

When choosing adhesives, the one to avoid is 3M 77. This stuff grabs very well initially, but will allow the vinyl or leather to "creep" on the first warm day. Use the stuff Eric recommends.

For foam padding, I like to use the closed-cell variety, such as DuPont Cyrel, but there are a number of closed-cell foams that will work. This stuff is white and smooth, and is very nice to work with. I used it under the sill vinyl and wheelarch moquette with good results. I've never liked the traditional upholstery foams because they all eventually degrade to powder, as anyone who has stripped out an original E-Type interior has seen. "Organic" materials such as jute and horshair have their own problems when they get wet. The closed-cell foams just don't seem to have any drawbacks. Better living through chemistry, as they say...


2009-06-03 06:44:43  |  Daniel Shalit writes:

Any hints on how to cover the arm rests?


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